October 13, 2011
[tw for misogynist and ableist language] wow cool, there are some really. really. horrible messages in FYJT

shelletor:

i hate everyone and

i hate being called a “bitch” because God fucking forbid I want to read comics where women aren’t treated like shit

sorry it’s issue #1, I forgot I need to read like 100 more before I can decide to make opinions.

And yeah I do know how comics work. WHICH IS HALF OF THE FUCKING PROBLEM

but that’s cool call me a bitch and shitty and stupid

fuck you.

 You know I really didn’t want to say anything but…

Basically what Shelley said. At what point do people think this is OK?

My favourite part is that after we’re called bitches and told to calm down, chill out and let the issue drop is that our tone is just way too hostile and negative. :| Or that we (and Laura Hudson) have set women back 50 years.  :| :|

(Source: cooltrainershells)

July 26, 2011

the-g-box:

My video petition to DC Comics reminding them of the value of Barbara Gordon as Oracle, for the Barbara’s Not Broken campaign.

I’m not sure if this is the same fellow who wrote the essay for Bleeding Cool as well, but it is a brilliant essay. I was wowed by how many arguments for making Babs no longer a wheelchair user that he completely shot down and did so well. I suggest you check it out

(Source: ericanthonyglover)

June 18, 2011
comiccharm:

I walked into my local comic shop today and was bombarded with all sorts of offensive comments (comments that I found offensive, they were very sexist and ableist) today about the DC reboot by a notorious staff member there.  I was so infuriated that when I got home I needed to draw a comic about it, so here it is.
I believe that everyone is entitled to their own opinion but I don’t need to be smacked in the face with this kind of vitrol when all I want to do is just buy a few comics.  I work part-time in customer service and one thing I know is that you don’t rip apart your customer’s choices no matter what you think on the matter.  If asked to give your opinion then sure, it’s fine.  But I was assaulted with these comments as soon as I made it to the counter.
The staff there know I religiously buy Birds of Prey and Batgirl and this staff member in particular was obviously ribbing me about the whole Barbara Gordon thing. I’m not angry that he thinks that Babs being Batgirl is awesome, I’m angry because he felt the need to tell me that he thinks it’s awesome because ‘Oracle was useless’ and that people in wheelchairs can’t do anything.  He also made some offensive comments about Huntress and Powergirl, two characters that really mean a lot to me personally.
My LCS is a small shop and the only comic shop in the State, plus my friend works there so I try to support them where I can.  I’ve been a customer there for years and always look forward to going there and casting my eyes over the tiny selection of floppies they have on the shelves.  But after this morning I think I’ll be cancelling all of my current orders and shopping elsewhere.  I’m getting an iPad at the end of the month and it seems like a great time for me to switch to digital or just stick to trades so my exposure to such people are limited.

If you feel comfortable doing it, I think you should let them know why you’re going to cancel your subscription with them. I’m glad you feel comfortable going with digital, though! 

comiccharm:

I walked into my local comic shop today and was bombarded with all sorts of offensive comments (comments that I found offensive, they were very sexist and ableist) today about the DC reboot by a notorious staff member there.  I was so infuriated that when I got home I needed to draw a comic about it, so here it is.

I believe that everyone is entitled to their own opinion but I don’t need to be smacked in the face with this kind of vitrol when all I want to do is just buy a few comics.  I work part-time in customer service and one thing I know is that you don’t rip apart your customer’s choices no matter what you think on the matter.  If asked to give your opinion then sure, it’s fine.  But I was assaulted with these comments as soon as I made it to the counter.

The staff there know I religiously buy Birds of Prey and Batgirl and this staff member in particular was obviously ribbing me about the whole Barbara Gordon thing. I’m not angry that he thinks that Babs being Batgirl is awesome, I’m angry because he felt the need to tell me that he thinks it’s awesome because ‘Oracle was useless’ and that people in wheelchairs can’t do anything.  He also made some offensive comments about Huntress and Powergirl, two characters that really mean a lot to me personally.

My LCS is a small shop and the only comic shop in the State, plus my friend works there so I try to support them where I can.  I’ve been a customer there for years and always look forward to going there and casting my eyes over the tiny selection of floppies they have on the shelves.  But after this morning I think I’ll be cancelling all of my current orders and shopping elsewhere.  I’m getting an iPad at the end of the month and it seems like a great time for me to switch to digital or just stick to trades so my exposure to such people are limited.

If you feel comfortable doing it, I think you should let them know why you’re going to cancel your subscription with them. I’m glad you feel comfortable going with digital, though! 

1:46pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZWvbJy6C-i_C
  
Filed under: sexism ableism comics 
June 12, 2011
you know what?

gwenfrankenstien:

i try not to because i guess it’s mean but

if babs-as-batgirl is your favourite batgirl

and you like batgirl more than oracle

i assume you’re an asshole

[trigger warning: ableism]

Oh man, speaking of, there is this guy on CBR who is so excited about Babs being Batgirl again and he says the most asshole, ableist comments. 

Like this gem

I really am saddened by those with disabilities in wheelchairs that became attached to Barbara’s 2nd identity as Oracle and feel they have a loss. But hopefully Wendy will still exist in this reality (see this thread: http://forums.comicbookresources.com…d.php?t=372125), and also don’t forget the Chief of the Doom Patrol. That’s two characters in wheelchairs right there to find inspiration with.

Apparently Marvel’s Tom Breevort said something very similar. When will people realise that you can’t replace one character with disabilities with another. Seriously missing the point. 

Or this one:

And THERE you have it, it’s all about the numbers. More #’s equals more $$$ for DC and the overlying corps that are attached to them now. You can have an Oracle fan that can buy the one limited action figure she had, Steph/Batgirl who also had only one action figure, and Cass/Batgirl who had two action figures & a few t-shirts. OR there is Babs/Batgirl who sells bobbleheads, at least 3 different Barbie’s, Toner dolls, action figures GALORE (so many I couldn’t figure the count), posters, stickers, t-shirts, lunch boxes, Pez dispensers, underwear, etc. etc! From a business standpoint it’s a complete and total no-brainer.

A complete and total no-brainer! /seething

1:13pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZWvbJy60wHXW
  
Filed under: ableism oracle 
June 6, 2011
gwenfrankenstien:

[img: Barbara Gordon as Oracle, from an early Birds of Prey issue.
Text: “Y’know, a lot of the time it’s like you Batguys want me to hold on to the past because YOU can’t get over it. Understand— I HAVE.I have a new life now, one I like— One that FULFILLS me. It’s not the SAME one I had before, but it’s GOOD. Maybe even BETTER.”]

gwenfrankenstien:

[img: Barbara Gordon as Oracle, from an early Birds of Prey issue.

Text: “Y’know, a lot of the time it’s like you Batguys want me to hold on to the past because YOU can’t get over it. Understand— I HAVE.

I have a new life now, one I like— One that FULFILLS me. It’s not the SAME one I had before, but it’s GOOD. Maybe even BETTER.”]

(via oblonskys)

June 6, 2011
"

Since I started dating a paralyzed guy (who’s rather fond of wheelchair-using Oracle since he’s also a computer geek, causing me to nickname him Boy Oracle), I’ve had the opportunity to talk to a number of other wheelchair users who all admire Oracle for being a perfectly strong, capable woman who happens to be paralyzed. Her presentation as a strong and beautiful woman is empowering for wheelchair users. Go to disabilities forums and see how many women sport her as their avatar. Go to cosplay websites and see how many women in wheelchairs happily represent Oracle at cons and even do photoshoots in character, proudly displaying the FACT that someone can be disabled and still be attractive and strong. Look at blogs like the one Benicio has linked and see how greatly that representation for wheelchair users and other disabled people is needed. Look at the debates about her character on such forums — she has come to represent an entire audience that has hitherto received NO representation at all. Look at the reactions in the disabled community to news reports on treatments that give false hope to “healing” paralysis — they tend to be pretty damn negative.

If DC strips Barbara of all that she has become as a character and all that she has come to represent for marginalized communities who have NO ONE they can relate to in the stories they love to read, then yes, it IS a big “fuck you” to those audiences. It’s saying that their support of the character and adoption of her as a fictional representative doesn’t matter. It’s saying that, while other communities are (finally) starting to get more representation, the disabled community doesn’t deserve the same. It’s saying that everything that Barbara has become as a paralyzed woman — a hero in her own right FAR more powerful than Batgirl and, in many ways, more powerful than Batman or Superman — means nothing. It’s negating a history that has come to mean so much to people who get no representation anywhere else, painting over it like it never happened. It’s saying that there’s something wrong with existing as a capable person who happens to have mobility issues, so that existence needs to be wiped away.

I hope it isn’t Babs. I hope it’s a fakeout.

"

Kate Fatale, always amazing, her comment says it so much better than I ever could. 

June 5, 2011
On disability and visibility …

puckett101:

In the wake of that sketch of Barbara Gordon in her Batgirl costume walking away from her wheelchair, I felt compelled to write. I ignored that compulsion until I calmed down, because most of it was frustration and anger.

I can absolutely understand why people are excited about the possibility of Barbara Gordon walking again - it’s not that they’re prejudiced or that they have any animosity for the disabled, it would be joy and happiness for the character. Oddly enough, I’ve had this exact same conversation - only about us - with a friend of mine who has a degenerative condition that will eventually kill him.

You see, I’m disabled. I have been for several years. On the good days, I function well enough to run a few errands or do a load of dishes or laundry. On most days, I have to take medication that renders me incapable of performing a lot of fine motor skill functions and usually knocks me out. On the bad days - and there are more of them than there are good days - I struggle to get to the bathroom which is barely 10 feet from my bed.

My friend has a laundry list of problems - it’s best summarized by noting that he’s about 90-95% quadriplegic and that his conditions will eventually kill him. It could happen sooner rather than later or vice versa, but he knows his death is coming much sooner than mine, and he knows what will kill him or what will allow something else to kill him.

We had a chat a while back. I told him that if I had a wish, I’d wish they’d find a cure for him since my stuff won’t kill me and he responded with one of the most brutally realistic assessments I’ve ever heard from someone - he wished that the docs could fix me because it would take him years of physical therapy to do almost anything, given how much his body has deteriorated. Me? I’d be facing a lot of rehabilitation, but I could probably be back to something resembling normal in a couple of years of intensive physical therapy if the docs can ever patch me up enough to allow for that.

It’s not that we, as disabled people, wouldn’t be happy for Babs if she could walk again. I’d be thrilled if the docs could cure my friend so he doesn’t die. I’d be ecstatic if I heard from a girl I knew back in 8th grade who had spina bifida and she told me that the docs had been able to restore her ability to walk. I have no way to describe how I would feel if the docs could patch me up enough that I could pick up my little girl again or wrestle with her or run around in a park with her. She turns 10 this year, and I don’t know if she remembers when I could do that and did. If you don’t understand how that thought feels - how it feels to be unsure if your little girl remembers when she woke up from a nightmare and you were there to pick her up and comfort her because most of what that child has known of your life is disability - then it’s going to be difficult for you to understand why disabled people look at Babs the way we do.

It’s that every single healing mechanism in the DCU has been tried on Babs and found wanting. None of it has restored her ability to walk. It’s 23-odd years of canon. More importantly, Babs has accepted her disability and made the best of it, transforming herself into a world-class computer expert who does more as Oracle, who helps more heroes, who saves more lives, who stops more villains, than she ever did as Batgirl.

As Batgirl, her ability to effect change was limited to what she could punch. As Oracle, she can reach any network, any data store, contact any hero, anywhere … she can reach farther and deeper than she ever could before. Think of it as the difference between Cyclops and Professor X - Scott Summers can affect only what he can see. Professor X can affect almost anything.

In allowing Alan Moore to disable Barbara Gordon, and then keeping that in continuity since 1988, DC allowed Babs to become a vastly more powerful hero than she had ever been before. It no longer matters whether DC planned it that way (and I doubt they did) or whether it was accidental / inadvertent (and it probably was - scope creep affects every project, and DC probably didn’t notice how integral Oracle had become until Oracle was already so powerful that she couldn’t really be stopped, because what could they do? Paralyze her again?), Oracle had become one of the epic bad-asses of the DCU, and far more bad-ass than Batgirl had ever been. From her wheelchair.

Why does this matter?

Because we, as disabled people, face struggles that the able-bodied can’t understand. As an example, I was trying to cross a two-lane street the other day - I can walk, but I walk slowly and with a cane to stabilize my gait. I wait for cars to pass so I’m not inconveniencing anyone. I entered the crosswalk and a car pulled up on the cross-street, then started to turn directly into me and honked at me to speed up. Until the driver saw the cane. Then they looked away and something that looked like shame spread across their face.

That’s all too typical. Most disabled people are used to pity - people meaning well, but being inadvertently condescending. Most disabled people are used to avoidance - people seeing us and then quickly looking away, whether to avoid staring or because they’re uncomfortable with the disabled. It’s just part of the territory, like sharks in water or bears in woods or Godzillas in Tokyo.

But then I recently read an article about the difference between monsters and heroes in comics. And frankly, I politely and academically lost my proverbial shit when the author began talking about The Other, and the ability to pass as normal and so on. In essence, the author’s clumsy and ineffective scholarship, along with his jargon-laden writing, equated the disabled - people with canes, in wheelchairs, etc. - with monsters because we can’t pass as able-bodied people. In the author’s argument, he distinctly noted that it isn’t power that makes people monsters, it’s their appearance and ability to pass as normal. The author went so far as to say that people perceive the mere existence of The Other as a crime against nature.

At the time, I wrote:

“As a visibly disabled person, I’m already feeling a bit like the author’s saying I’m a violation of the natural order because I can’t readily ‘pass’ as normal. More bluntly, the way this argument is being framed so far feels somewhat prejudiced, regardless of whether it’s intentional or not. If the distinction between a monster and human is whether one can ‘pass’ as normal - and I can’t - then the author is effectively arguing that those who can’t are monsters.”

Now, for the sake of people who managed to get through life without dealing with The Other or abjection in critical theory (and also don’t want to wade through those Wikipedia links, and honestly, I can’t blame you), here’s a brief summation of the ideas:

The Other, simply put, is different from The Same. The Same is you and people like you, or something else which is like something else. The Other is anything outside that grouping, especially if it makes you feel uncomfortable. That’s where the idea of abjection comes in.

Abjection is the part of The Other that makes people feel uncomfortable. Since The Other exists outside The Same, being faced with it can be traumatic for people, such as seeing a friend in hospice care, dying from cancer. Abjection, in this sense, refers to anything that falls outside someone’s definition of sameness - it can include race, gender, sexual preference or gender orientation, etc. And it often includes the disabled.

Now cue up your Don LaFontaine voice:

“In a world filled with people who see monsters everywhere, one brave woman has the courage and strength to prove them all wrong just by being herself.”

So let’s be really blunt. And be honest with yourself, even if you never admit this to anyone. Disabled people make people feel uncomfortable. I spend a lot of time in doctors’ offices with people who have to be transported by ambulance due to their disability, and I still look at them and think how comparatively lucky I am.

Disability reminds us how fragile we really are as a species and how easily it can be taken away by disease, by aging, by freak accident. Or by some jackass in clown make-up wearing a Hawaiian shirt, although that is a statistically less likely way of becoming disabled.

Disability, in very profound ways, scares us. In fact, it terrifies us because it reminds us of our mortality. It reminds us that we will all die someday, and that we don’t all get to jump on grenades to save our friends or heroically push a child out of the way of a speeding truck. Most of us will die of old age, swallowing more pills than we did the year before to control our heart problems, our cholesterol count, to improve our kidney functions and so on.

Seeing disability and fearing it is seeing our future and not being emotionally ready or prepared to even acknowledge it, much less face it.

So this Otherness and abjection stuff isn’t just crap-ass academic Ivory Tower bullshit. It isn’t just some blowhard who never worked a real job talking out their ass. It’s real, practical, applicable stuff which is usually pretty rare for critical theory.

But here’s the thing - The Other is only The Other as long as people are able to remain ignorant of it. Out of sight, out of mind and all that. When people begin being exposed to something different, it can be traumatic - you may not remember the first time someone besides your parents held you as a baby, but the adults in the room probably talked about how cute you were as you cried because you recognized The Other - it wasn’t you and it wasn’t your source of milk, therefore it was The Other, it was abject and it scared you. But as you grew, adults - giants that they were - became less scary.

And the same is true for disability, even in something that seems as simple as a comic book.

Seeing a disabled person in a comic is sufficiently removed from direct personal experience to ease the discomfort someone might feel when seeing someone in a wheelchair. Seeing that character over and over further reduces those negative emotions. Think of it, in a way, as exposure therapy for The Other.

So. Why are we upset about the idea of Barbara Gordon coming out of her wheelchair?

Because you’ve said she couldn’t for more than 23 years.

Because she’s visibly disabled and extremely capable, arguably more so than many able-bodied heroes.

Because we have people writing ham-handed critical theory about comics which equates disabled people with monsters.

Because goddammit, she’s one of the very few disabled role models in comics, one of the very people in comics that disabled people can look at and see their own struggles for respect, for equality, for simple dignity reflected back at them.

Because when you create a character like this, when you maintain that character and her origins for so long and let people cheer for her and - by proxy - for ourselves, you have something like a responsibility to maintain that character, to not tarnish her with scandal or sordid behavior that is not in keeping with her ethics and morals, to uphold that character as an example of the goodness she has represented for the past quarter-century despite, or (in Oracle’s case) because of being in a wheelchair.

When you toy with that, when you play with it, you aren’t just updating a character or making something more relevant - you’re tinkering with one of the very few characters in comics that we can look at and recognize as one of our own.

And is it really wrong or harmful to want to see yourself reflected in a comic, to imagine yourself being able to be that heroic and noble, before returning to the grind of daily life, when simple tasks are struggles and may require assistance, before you go back to needing a nurse’s assistance to simply go to the bathroom?

When you tinker with this stuff, you’re messing around with things that can make difficult lives easier, that can bring joy into those lives and happiness that one of us is reflected in this fictional universe, and she’s even more capable and heroic than people who don’t think twice about whether they’re physically able to fly around the world - much less stroll down the block.

When you tinker with this stuff, you’re effectively tinkering with reality, and when you erase a character like Oracle from the universe, the effect might as well be removing the disabled from our reality as well.

It’s already June and the reboot / relaunch is coming in September. We’ll see then what happens with Batgirl, Barbara Gordon and Oracle. In the meantime, I’m crossing my fingers that disabled people still have a place of heroism in the DCU.

(Emphasis mine)

June 4, 2011
thegirlsofgotham:

dcwomenkickingass:

yellowperil:

Though Bruce is still Sad Bats over his parent’s death even in his new #1, Babs couldn’t be happier about getting her walk on.

With the rumors coming out of this DCU reboot, I knew I was going to start seeing images like this. And it bothers the hell out of me.
As we learn more over the next week, I’m sure there will be people  absolutely thrilled if Babs is back in the tights. And there will be those  who are equally as upset.
But please remember for many people that chair on the left is something they will never leave.
My mother used a chair for the last years of her life. (I think that’s part of my strong feelings for Oracle, I won’t lie.) For the real-life Oracles, there isn’t any walking away smiling because of magic “get out of the wheel chair” cards.
Please I don’t want anyone to go after this artist. They are talented. I just want people to be aware that there are some sensitive areas around this, if indeed, DC goes in this direction.*

* and if they do then there will be a post the likes of which you can only imagine.

MY RANT ON THIS:
Wow. Way to make it personal much? It’s fine to relate to characters, but Oracle isn’t your mother. She wasn’t dipped in the Lazarus Pit. It’s a separate universe reboot series. SHE’S FUCKING BATGIRL AGAIN OMG FANGIRL SQUEEEEEEEEEE. If you want to look at it from an emotional standpoint, Oracle is a phenomenal character. But before she was Oracle, she was kicking ass as Batgirl. It was as big a part of who she is as the wheelchair and the story that put her there. Don’t knock it just because it’s a chance to see her in that light again. She’s not turning her back on Oracle. She’s still Oracle. This is completely separate from the regular books - it just happens to be COMPLETELY FUCKING AWESOME ZOMGWTFBBQ.

So, if a person of colour is upset because they don’t see an image of themselves in comics, is that making it too personal? Because by saying it’s making it “too personal” you are being incredibly privileged. Good for you for having representations of yourself in comics. Do differently abled people? What’s their representation? Because you’re taking one of a handful away. 
Also, wow, way to be horribly insensitive. 

thegirlsofgotham:

dcwomenkickingass:

yellowperil:

Though Bruce is still Sad Bats over his parent’s death even in his new #1, Babs couldn’t be happier about getting her walk on.

With the rumors coming out of this DCU reboot, I knew I was going to start seeing images like this. And it bothers the hell out of me.

As we learn more over the next week, I’m sure there will be people absolutely thrilled if Babs is back in the tights. And there will be those who are equally as upset.

But please remember for many people that chair on the left is something they will never leave.

My mother used a chair for the last years of her life. (I think that’s part of my strong feelings for Oracle, I won’t lie.) For the real-life Oracles, there isn’t any walking away smiling because of magic “get out of the wheel chair” cards.

Please I don’t want anyone to go after this artist. They are talented. I just want people to be aware that there are some sensitive areas around this, if indeed, DC goes in this direction.*

* and if they do then there will be a post the likes of which you can only imagine.

MY RANT ON THIS:

Wow. Way to make it personal much? It’s fine to relate to characters, but Oracle isn’t your mother. She wasn’t dipped in the Lazarus Pit. It’s a separate universe reboot series. SHE’S FUCKING BATGIRL AGAIN OMG FANGIRL SQUEEEEEEEEEE. If you want to look at it from an emotional standpoint, Oracle is a phenomenal character. But before she was Oracle, she was kicking ass as Batgirl. It was as big a part of who she is as the wheelchair and the story that put her there. Don’t knock it just because it’s a chance to see her in that light again. She’s not turning her back on Oracle. She’s still Oracle. This is completely separate from the regular books - it just happens to be COMPLETELY FUCKING AWESOME ZOMGWTFBBQ.

So, if a person of colour is upset because they don’t see an image of themselves in comics, is that making it too personal? Because by saying it’s making it “too personal” you are being incredibly privileged. Good for you for having representations of yourself in comics. Do differently abled people? What’s their representation? Because you’re taking one of a handful away. 

Also, wow, way to be horribly insensitive. 

June 3, 2011
dcwomenkickingass:

yellowperil:

Though Bruce is still Sad Bats over his parent’s death even in his new #1, Babs couldn’t be happier about getting her walk on.

With the rumors coming out of this DCU reboot, I knew I was going to start seeing images like this. And it bothers the hell out of me.
As we learn more over the next week, I’m sure there will be people  absolutely thrilled if Babs is back in the tights. And there will be those  who are equally as upset.
But please remember for many people that chair on the left is something they will never leave.
My mother used a chair for the last years of her life. (I think that’s part of my strong feelings for Oracle, I won’t lie.) For the real-life Oracles, there isn’t any walking away smiling because of magic “get out of the wheel chair” cards.
Please I don’t want anyone to go after this artist. They are talented. I just want people to be aware that there are some sensitive areas around this, if indeed, DC goes in this direction.*

* and if they do then there will be a post the likes of which you can only imagine.

Emphasis mine. The idea this image is based on is actually quite hurtful and ableist. 

dcwomenkickingass:

yellowperil:

Though Bruce is still Sad Bats over his parent’s death even in his new #1, Babs couldn’t be happier about getting her walk on.

With the rumors coming out of this DCU reboot, I knew I was going to start seeing images like this. And it bothers the hell out of me.

As we learn more over the next week, I’m sure there will be people absolutely thrilled if Babs is back in the tights. And there will be those who are equally as upset.

But please remember for many people that chair on the left is something they will never leave.

My mother used a chair for the last years of her life. (I think that’s part of my strong feelings for Oracle, I won’t lie.) For the real-life Oracles, there isn’t any walking away smiling because of magic “get out of the wheel chair” cards.

Please I don’t want anyone to go after this artist. They are talented. I just want people to be aware that there are some sensitive areas around this, if indeed, DC goes in this direction.*

* and if they do then there will be a post the likes of which you can only imagine.

Emphasis mine. The idea this image is based on is actually quite hurtful and ableist. 

April 28, 2011

shitsandwich:

APE IN A CAPE: [TRIGGER WARNING: Ableist imagery and language]

todayistheday:

comicbooks:

gailsimone:

elliottmarshal:

I can’t think of a way for this to be any more offensive:

The Red Hood is a Jerk by ~starwind824

followed by this image description: 

“I’m not saying Jason Todd has stolen Oracle’s chair and kicked her cripple ass to the ground, but he totally would. Anywho thats [me] as Countdown era Todd, and my wifey as Oracle. Will I cosplay Nightwing next and cheat on Starfire with her? Probably not.”

I don’t think I’ve ever hated another fan as much as I do right now. 

I don’t even know what to say to this.

Horrible.

I don’t find any appeal to this. This is degrading to the characters… and in general. The people that created this are actually getting a kick out of it.

Gail is right, this is just horrible.

I think this is just fine. Oversensitive internet nerds need to get a sense of humour.

Fucking dumb. I vote that they should cosplay the joker crippling and taking nude pictures of her instead.  Hopefully that will be canon enough for these humorless fucking babies.

Wow, holy shit, I had no idea these comments could get more asshole-ish, but way to be a fucking ableist, sexist and misogynistic asshole. Way to go, fuckwad! 

(Source: cureelliott)

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