April 18, 2014
theatlantic:

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol: The Craziest Superhero Story Ever Told

For most superheroes, fighting for truth and justice means fighting for the status quo.  The typical plot: Supervillain(s) attempts to take over the world and/or steal property; superhero(es) stop them.
The journey from disjunction to order is only emphasized by the fact that the heroes are themselves often outsiders in some way. Superman is an immigrant; Batman has a traumatic childhood backstory; the X-Men are policed and persecuted mutants. Yet despite the fact that they are underdogs, the heroes nonetheless fight for the mainstream authorities. Thus superheroes are often fantasies of assimilation—a dream of outsiders being accepted by, or turning into, insiders.
At best, that fantasy offers a promise of acceptance to everyone, making for an inclusive vision of the American dream. At worst, superheroes end up as establishment lackeys, marginalized individuals currying favor with the mainstream by targeting other excluded groups on behalf of the Man.
Twenty-five years ago, though, in 1989 writer Grant Morrison and artist Richard Case began working on Doom Patrol, a comic that ended up telling a different kind of superhero story. Over four years and 44 issues, Morrison, Case, and a number of other fill-in artists inverted the usual connection between heroes and the law.
Read more. [Image: DC]

theatlantic:

Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol: The Craziest Superhero Story Ever Told

For most superheroes, fighting for truth and justice means fighting for the status quo.  The typical plot: Supervillain(s) attempts to take over the world and/or steal property; superhero(es) stop them.

The journey from disjunction to order is only emphasized by the fact that the heroes are themselves often outsiders in some way. Superman is an immigrant; Batman has a traumatic childhood backstory; the X-Men are policed and persecuted mutants. Yet despite the fact that they are underdogs, the heroes nonetheless fight for the mainstream authorities. Thus superheroes are often fantasies of assimilation—a dream of outsiders being accepted by, or turning into, insiders.

At best, that fantasy offers a promise of acceptance to everyone, making for an inclusive vision of the American dream. At worst, superheroes end up as establishment lackeys, marginalized individuals currying favor with the mainstream by targeting other excluded groups on behalf of the Man.

Twenty-five years ago, though, in 1989 writer Grant Morrison and artist Richard Case began working on Doom Patrol, a comic that ended up telling a different kind of superhero story. Over four years and 44 issues, Morrison, Case, and a number of other fill-in artists inverted the usual connection between heroes and the law.

Read more. [Image: DC]

(via cognitivedissonance)

April 18, 2014
"It’s funny, the stereotypes we given. Lazy, as if we ain’t build an entire country on our backs. Thieves, as if we wasn’t stolen from our home. Hateful, as if we was the ones that murder for dark skin. Selfish, as if we took over another people’s country and claimed they land as our own. Funny, how them stereotypes so perfectly describe the ones who done doomed us all."

— My grandmother, talking to my brother who was recently called, “nothing but a black thug” for daring to wear a hoodie in the rain. (via asiaraymonet)

(via cognitivedissonance)

April 18, 2014
florianpichon:

Wonder Woman II , digital 2014

After the first one, the whole design idea I had in my mind for that iconic DC woman. 
Inspired by modern attire, her iconic original suit color scheme , with a modern day gladiator/wrestling taste. Neckline is inspired by Padaung necklaces.

florianpichon:

Wonder Woman II , digital 2014

After the first one, the whole design idea I had in my mind for that iconic DC woman.
Inspired by modern attire, her iconic original suit color scheme , with a modern day gladiator/wrestling taste. Neckline is inspired by Padaung necklaces.

April 13, 2014

thebicker:

newwavefeminism:

infernumequinomin:

nicolas-christ:

Pantene Philippines #whipit Labels against women

This is so relevant it’s not even funny.

That vanity issue. Telling they’re worthless if they don’t look dolled up, but are shallow if they doll themselves up.

They’ve done studies that prove this is absolutely true (not that any of you doubted it). Sheryl Sandberg wrote about it a lot in Lean In, in the context of how bosses and job applicants are perceived. It’s known as the Heidi/Howard experiment. A man and a woman with equal accomplishments are viewed completely differently. Women are viewed as either nice or competent - not both. 

(Source: yearofyixing, via cognitivedissonance)

9:44pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZWvbJy1CzyGhT
  
Filed under: Sexism 
April 12, 2014

NEVER FORGET WHO GOT THAT SHOT IN

NEVER FORGET

(Source: who-the-hells-bucky-barnes)

April 12, 2014
Nicola Scott’s Wondy is absolute perfection

Nicola Scott’s Wondy is absolute perfection

(Source: eugenetrepanier)

April 12, 2014
okelleok:

warriors of love and justice

DEAAAAD

okelleok:

warriors of love and justice

DEAAAAD

April 12, 2014

cognitivedissonance:

“If you feel like playing film critic misogyny bingo when America’s first round of Winter Soldier reviews are published this week, I recommend looking out for the phrases “leather-clad” and “ass-kicker.” These are an easy way to weed out any reviewers who weren’t paying attention to the movie, because neither phrase describes Black Widow’s actual role. For one thing, Black Widow is not “leather-clad.” Not unless you’re talking about the casual leather jacket she wears in a handful of scenes, anyway. Her official uniform is no tighter than Captain America’s was in The Avengers, and is similar to S.H.I.E.L.D.’s artificial fabric jumpsuits. By comparison, the Winter Soldier’s signature look involves leather body armor, ’90s grunge hair, smudged eyeliner, and a black rubber mask. Spider-Man’s spandex costume is probably more salacious, but I’m pretty sure he doesn’t wind up being described as an homme fatale by anyone with a Pulitzer. Honestly, this kind of catsuit-focused review says more about the reviewer than the film itself. Apparently the mere concept of Scarlett Johansson in a tight outfit is so dazzlingly erotic that it bypasses some male reviewers’ conscious minds and causes them to ignore everything she says and does for the rest of the movie. The result is a series of reviews from highly respected film critics who, given the opportunity to describe each Avenger in a single sentence, replace Black Widow’s summary with the announcement, “I AM A HETEROSEXUAL MAN AND SCARLETT JOHANSSON’S BOOBS ARE AWESOME.” …. This unrelenting focus on Scarlett Johansson’s appearance, coupled with the assumption that her only non-decorative role is that of an “ass-kicker,” indicates a fundamental inability to see Black Widow as the well-rounded character she actually is.”

Gavia Baker-Whitelaw, “Every review of Black Widow in ‘Captain America’ is wrong” 

(x)

(Source: mysnarkasm)

April 11, 2014

(Detective Comics - 859)

(via ealperin)

April 10, 2014
pinuparena:

By Blule

pinuparena:

By Blule

2:59pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZWvbJy1Cg7Wvj
  
Filed under: black widow 
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